Macy's Creates Controversy With Launch of Muslim Clothing Line

Macy’s has become the first major American department store to court Muslim Fashion

Muslim shoppers can soon walk into Macy’s and choose a clothing of their choice. The department store has announced that it had partnered with Verona Collection. The latter is a boutique known for designing and selling modest dresses, hijabs, cardigans, and tops. The date for online launch is February 15.

Macy is one the many recent entrants trying to generate revenues from the largely untapped Islamic clothing market. It is not a pioneer in this regard. Nike in 2017 began selling a hijab made specifically for Muslim athletes. Denim hijabs are now found in American Eagle stores. Even DKNY started its Ramadan collection characterized by low and flowing dresses.

Verona Collection was founded by Lisa Vogl, a Muslim convert and a graduate of Macy’s in-house program specializing in women and minority-owned development programs. The aim of such an effort to enable more diversity in fashion. The Islamic themed Verona clothes will be found hanging alongside mainstream clothing from a range of well-known designers like Ivanka Trump and Anne Klein. The price range of the Verona line will start from $13 and the maximum will be $85.

In a press release, Vogl said that she started her business after she felt frustrated with the existing line of fashionable choices for individuals who are stylish but prefers demure clothing. She claimed that Verona is more than a simply a branded clothes collection. It can be regarded as a platform for all those women who want to express their own personal identities. These women embrace fashion which makes them confident not only outside but also on the inside. Cassandra Jones, Macy’s Fashion senior vice president, concurs. She said that the Verona like provides an understated and unique elegance through the daily essentials for women who want comfort, versatility, and style at the same time. The partnership between Macy’s and Verona will enable modest fashion preferring customers a wider range of clothing choices.

It is inevitable that the move by Macy’s to cater Muslim choices has drawn criticism from a number of quarters. Many critics say that the garment is synonymous with women oppression. Asra Q. Nomani pointed out that the hijab is not a fashion statement but a political ideology. It promotes gender apartheid. She said that the same apartheid is practiced in mosques and public places. Conversely, a few have praised the company for being an inclusive one.

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