Pastor Poisoning Ugandans with a Bleach 'Miracle Cure'

50,000 Ugandans have been poisoned

Robert Baldwin, an American pastor, and Sam Little, a British clairvoyant, are administering a Ugandan network where sick Ugandans are offered a miracle cure , marketed as miracle mineral solution (MMS) to cure them of their sickness. It was found that the MMS is nothing more than industrial bleach. The Baldwin operated ministry named Global Healing claims that the concoction cures a wide number of ailments like cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS among other diseases.

The network head is Baldwin, a New Jersey native, and Global Healing is partly funded by Little, a native of Arlesey, Bedfordshire. The Guardian has reported that poor Ugandans, including toddlers, are being given chlorine dioxide, a product with zero health benefit and may cause adverse health implications. The 52-year-old American imports the industrial compound into Uganda from China, with large quantities of citric acid and sodium chloride making their way into the developing African nation. It is estimated that 50,000 Ugandans have already been poisoned by the compound.

Baldwin has supposedly “trained” approximately 1,200 clerics in the country on the proper procedure of administering the MMS. Each trained cleric uses his training to treat approximately 50 congregants, with the event usually happening post-Sunday service. The American has played his cards right: he offers smartphones to docile clerics as inducements and favors those who clearly shows commitment to spreading this bleach cure.

Baldwin is fully aware of his illegal actions. In his phone conversation with an anti-quack medicine campaigner, the American said he distributed bleach via churches as he wanted to run a discreet operation. Fiona O’Leary, the anti-quack campaigner in question, went undercover as a freelance journalist and recorded Baldwin saying that he has no wish to run afoul of government agencies or drug manufacturing companies. Therefore, his operations are low key and set up using Ugandan church resources. His only medical training was a student nurse and had no further medical expertise. The sole reason for selecting Uganda, he admitted, was that the country was poor and had poor regulatory practices.

Sam Little partly funded the MMS expansion. The 25-year-old Briton is presently operating out of Fort Portal, located in western Uganda. He said he had made money via “investments” and now using the savings to assist the funding of MMS distribution with Ugandan territory. He asserted that he donated $10,000 to that end.

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