Ben Carson is using “In God We Trust” to push his agenda that America has a national religion: Christianity.

The Republican presidential candidate is reigniting the motto “In God We Trust” which was originally embraced back in 1956. He firmly believes that this very motto is proof that the United States was always built upon a foundation of Christian faith. Speaking Sunday morning at a megachurch in Georgia, Ben Carson vowed to wage war on the nation’s “PC Police” in order to save the soul of our great country.

He claims that he has had an abundance of people ask of him: “Why are you willing to get into this fray when you had such a wonderful career and reputation and you were blessed financially and you could just sit back and relax?” The retired neurosurgeon explained why. “It’s because America is worth saving… If that means getting into a war with the PC police, I’m ready to fight that war – and I hope you will join me.”

As he signed copies of his latest book, A More Perfect Union, he stated to the local papers that his press tour touting the publishing was not at all planned or staged around his campaign run. A devout Seventh Day Adventist, Carson announced to the gathering crowd at the Free Chapel of Gainesville that if he were to be elected president, he would be sure to place God at the center of our nation’s culture and politics.

To further elaborate on his sentiment, Carson continued, “The pledge of allegiance to our flag says we are one nation under God. Many courtrooms in the land on the wall it says ‘In God We Trust.’ Every coin in our pocket, every bill in our wallet says ‘In God We Trust.’” When America’s Congress adopted the motto almost 6 decades ago during the Cold War, it was to replace the original United States motto of “E pluribus Unum” from 1782.

The adaptation (‘In God We Trust’) has been placed on coins since 1864 and printed upon currency since the late 1950s. While the Pledge of Allegiance was first written in 1892, it wasn’t formally assumed by Congress until 1945. However, the “under God” portion wasn’t added to this pledge until 1954.

Carson holds steady to his conviction that if it is good enough for our founding documents and our pledges and courts and money, then why is it so taboo to discuss openly? “In medicine, it is called schizophrenia – and I, for one, am simply not willing to kick God to the curb.”

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