A whopping 61% of survey respondents think Donald Trump is pro-Israel.

In the light of the continuing battle against terror, the Independent Democracy Institute and Tel Aviv University conducted a poll regarding domestic responses involving current terror-related events, and external to Israel, the presidential race in the United States and its implications for Israel.

Interestingly enough, the study reveals that Jewish Israelis prefer a candidate from the Republican party for the U.S. presidency. 34% of the Jewish public lean Republican compared to 28% who would prefer the democratic party. Of the contenders in the GOP, 61% say that frontrunner Donald Trump is “friendly to Israel.” As for from which party a more pro-Israel president would come from, 47% concluded that a democratic president would be more pro-Israel, 30% said there would be no difference, while 23% attested that a Republican president would be more pro-Israel.

Another significant figure is those who fear for their personal security: a whopping 66% of the Jewish public strongly or moderately fear that they or one of their loved ones will be a victim of a terror attack, a small decrease from the 70% figure in December 2015. However, the 66% count is still higher than the 57% who were fearful in October of the same year. The Arab public’s fear of terror was found to be higher than the Jewish public.

A great majority of the Jewish public (90%) unanimously believe that the international response and criticism of Israel’s current attitude words fighting terrorism is not at all or not so justified. It is notable that among Meretz (a left-wing, social-democratic political party in Israel) voters who represent the lowest figure that supports this stance, a majority 53% still view the international criticism is unjustifiable.

On the democratic side in the presidential race, 40.5% of the Jewish public prefer Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders from Israel’s standpoint. 16.5% prefer Sanders while 6% choose both, 10% choose neither, and 27% do not know.

The poll was done as part of the monthly “peace index” survey, a survey that queries Jews and Arabs on their feelings and attitudes about the prospects for the peace process. The data was gleaned from 600 respondents between February 28 and March 1.

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