Have Millenials Killed Exodus 20:7

MERLIJN HOEK is licensed under CC BY 2.0

If vanity is in style, what happens to “thou shalt not use the Lord’s name in vain”

Stubbed toes, spilled coffee and embarrassing moments all elicit the same response. A loud groan, maybe a few curse words, and the telltale “oh my God”. Other person favorites include “what on God’s green earth” and “oh my sweet baby Jesus in a manager.” The language of religion was a sign of reverence that used the Lord’s name in prayer, but now it’s used for the slightest inconveniences.

It is easy to ignore the importance of the third commandment in light of the immense, evident magnitude of “thou shalt not kill” and other biblical decrees, in fact, the third commandment only seems to appear when shaming millennials for text lingo such as “omg.”

Why is it that the most obvious implication of using the Lord’s name in vain is forgotten in favor of shaming the small prayers and exclamations of younger generations? Instead of using it to question the faith of modern Christians, instead, use it to question the language coming from proclaimed Christians who spout hate and intolerance.

As Christians, we take the name of Christ. To take the Lord’s name in vain is not to use it excessively, but instead to live life in a way Christ would not. To preach or practice intolerance would be using the Lord’s name in vain and “the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.”

Leviticus 19:12 reminds us “Do not swear falsely by my name and so profane the name of your God. I am the Lord.” This decree is normally used to justify the swearing on the bible of court cases, and it should be used to fight against those who claim to be the preacher of the Lord’s word but condemn the souls of His followers to Hell for nothing more than their sexual preferences, religion, skin color, age group or choice to get an abortion.

Don Wilton for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association attacks “beauty pageant contestants cover their mouths in shock as results are announced and proceed to use God’s name to emphasize their joy and triumph” as if there is no honor in thanking God for their little achievements. The modern world is increasingly personal. Deepest desires and thoughts are shared on Twitter and Snapchat stories feature all three meals of the day, the pull to share our lives with friends, family, and strangers across the world shouldn’t stop there.

We ask God to bless our meals, pray in times of strife, why can’t we thank God for our little achievements, why is the appreciation of God’s creation not acceptable for the littlest things in life? A beautiful flower on a sunny walk home is as worthy of an “Oh My God” as at our daily meals.

Instead of condemning the integration of God from the Church to the streets, let’s use the third commandment to condemn those who deceive the Lord’s word with hatred and intolerance.

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