Nazi Grandma gets two years behind bars.

German police located and arrested Ursula “Nazi Grandma” Haverbeck after she intentionally tried to avoid justice by not showing up at the prison gates to serve a two-year prison sentence. The 89-year-old grandmother, dubbed 'Nazi Grandma' was scheduled to arrive at the prison located in the Bielefeld town of Germany after she was sentenced for inciting hatred through her public denial of the Holocaust.

It was evident that Haverbeck had planned to run when police visited her home in central Germany and found piled-up mail that her home had been vacant for many days. The International Auschwitz Committee, a group of Holocaust survivors, urged the German police to intensify their existing search.

Haverbeck was sentenced in 2017. The November ruling said that she should spend 14 months behind bars on charges of Holocaust denial. Under German law, denying the occurrence of the Holocaust is a crime. She was scheduled to begin her prison term on May 3 but did not appear.

The Detmold district appeals court sentenced Haverbeck after she appeared for a previous conviction in 2016. The 89-year-old wrote to the Mayor of Detmold when the authorities were judging the legal fate of an Auschwitz guard. In her letter, she wrote that it was not a death camp but a labor camp. She continued to claim the same during the closing arguments. Her actions pushed the judge into yet another conviction.

A number of courts have previously sentenced Haverbeck to multiple prison sentences in the past. The district court in Berlin did the same in October. She, however, continued to stay free despite the pending appeals.

Haverbeck was arrested at her on Monday in Vlotho, a northwestern town in Germany. The prison transfer was carried out without delay. She once chaired an ultra-right training center which was engaged in the spread of Nazi propaganda. She completely denied that the Holocaust happened. Haverbeck, during a television appearance, declared the "Holocaust is the biggest and most sustained lie in history." Approximately 1.1 million individuals were slaughtered in 1940 to 1945 at the Auschwitz Birkenau camp.

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