PopeIslamaViolent

Pope Francis says it’s a war of economics, however, Franklin Graham thinks “this is a war of religion.”

On the plane ride back from Poland, Pope Francis told reporters that it is wrong to associate Islam with violence, instead citing social injustice and greed as the main causes of terrorism, reports The Guardian.

The context for the question was the recent killing of an 85-year-old Roman Catholic priest during a church service in France. The murder was claimed by Islamic State.

“I think that in nearly all religions there is always a small fundamentalist group,” he said. “[Catholicism] has them.”

He then said that he doesn’t like to talk about Islamic violence because he sees violent acts perpetrated by baptized Catholics in Italy all the time. “If I speak of Islamic violence, I have to speak of Catholic violence. Not all Muslims are violent.”

The Pope explained that economics, not religion, were the cause of terroristic acts across the globe. He said that war and terrorism are the results when “money is made a god” and it instead of people are put at the center of the world economy.

Reverend Franklin Graham disagrees with Pope Francis.

“I agree that the world is at war — but I disagree that it’s not a war of religion,” Graham said. “It is most certainly a war of religion.”

He went on to explain that Islam calls for the “extermination of ‘infidels’ outside their faith,” and that Radical Islamists “behead, rape and murder in the name of Islam. We should call it what it is.”

U.S. Cardinal Raymond Burke sides more with Graham than with the head of his church in this instance, stating that Islam “wants to govern the world” and that Americans must decide if they are going to reassert “the Christian origin of our own nation.”

Pope Francis continued to spread his Jesuit style of Catholicism while addressing a group of children at the end of World Youth Day festivities, promoting peace and love, instead of inciting war.

“…Download the best link of all, that of a heart which sees and transmits goodness without growing weary.”

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