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After receiving bomb threats, The Satanic Temple was finally able to unveil their statue of Baphomet in Detroit.

In literature, Baphomet is often depicted as a man with the head of a goat and sometimes with the breasts of a woman. He is usually shown pointing one hand up and one hand down. He means a lot of different things, however for the Satanic Temple, he symbolizes the reconciliation of opposites and plurality. He even serves a function, according to the spokesperson for The Satanic Temple, Lucien Greaves, as a chair for “people of all ages [to] sit on the lap of Satan for inspiration and contemplation.” The unveiling event for this monument, which was originally meant to stand alongside the Ten Commandments at the Oklahoma state Capital, was held a secret location to protect those who chose to attend from extremist violence and harm.

Protestors

The event was meant to be held at Bert’s Marketplace, however once the group had received threats to bomb the place and burn it down, they transferred it to a location that they kept hidden until the day of the event. Protestors who gathered together shared a singular thought: “The last thing we need in Detroit is having a welcome home party for evil.” They were outraged, and many would say in a very hypocritical manner considering that Christians were happy to put up the Ten Commandments monument in Oklahoma. In order to protect the people who wanted to attend the unveiling event, the Satanic Temple had to go through some pretty big measures. Ticket-holders were given a location on their e-ticket to go to for security check and to sign their eternal soul over to Satan before they were given the real location.

Metro Times was able to sit down with Jex Blackmore, who is part of the executive ministry at The Satanic Temple, for an interview. He explained that they have made sincere efforts to be transparent about who they are, what they believe in and more. They have written essays and done interviews, however it doesn’t help much when “they have no interest in learning or understanding.”

The event was held in Detroit because of their deep ties to the city. Their first chapter was established there, and both Blackmore and Dough Mesner call it home. In response to those who say they are the last thing Detroit needs, he said “Let us remember that Detroit has been a majority Christian community for decades. If the prayers of a single voice haven’t saved us yet, perhaps it is time to embrace the diversity of our great community and seek commonalities because one might argue that is what Detroit truly needs.”

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