Eid al-Fitr Prayer

Eid al-Fitr is a Muslim holiday that is celebrated all over the world, and marks the official end of Ramadan, the month of fasting.

After ensuring that they do not eat or drink anything during daylight hours, Muslim people will now come together to celebrate the sacrifices they have made, and also the friends and family they’re surrounded by. Eid al-Fitr, also known as The Feast of Breaking the Fast (meaning Ramadan), is often celebrated with a grand meal enjoyed by friends and family.

The very first Eid al-Fitr ever celebrated occurred at the instigation of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) in the year 624. It was created as a way to celebrate in a holy and respectful way. After the followers of Muhammad left Mecca and traveled to Medinah, he instructed them on the proper way to show thankfulness. Many of the traditions, such as sharing sweets between friends and family, and giving money and food to charities, are ancient in origin, but are kept by Muslims all over the world to this day.


Prime Minister of Britain David Cameron issued a video message Monday about Eid.

It is difficult to calculate the exact date of Eid al-Fitr because it is based on the first sighting of the new moon, which of course will occur at slightly different points around the world. Many people that live apart from their parents or siblings will come together in order to celebrate Eid al-Fitr with them, as this is truly one of the greatest Islamic celebrations in the Muslim calendar

In the UK, a huge celebration will occur on August 2 in Trafalgar Square, and many people around the world will celebrate it earlier, on July 28. In countries such as India and Pakistan, women will have henna tattoos painted on their hands, and in countries such as Somalia, native dances are performed to celebrate.

Regardless of where people are or where they are from, it is a chance to be generous, forgiving, and charitable while celebrating all that is good.

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