A 1993 interview with Hillary Clinton has surfaced in which she talks extensively about her religious upbringing.

Hillary Clinton has not had much luck in garnering the support of religious Americans. Many allegations have been made against the Democratic candidate saying she is actively engaged in attacking religion in America. Clinton's liberal stances on abortion, gay rights and immigrants have caused religious Americans, especially evangelicals and Protestants, to grow suspicious of her.

However, in April of 1993, then-First Lady Hillary Clinton spoke about her religious beliefs in an interview with The Washington Post. The interview, republished by The Washington Post Monday, reminds people once again of the Democrat's religious beliefs. The interview is part of a biographical series on her religious and political views, the influences of parents, and her youth minister.

In the interview, she said she was born into a very devout, Methodist family. As a teenager, she was under the spiritual guidance of her local church's youth minister, Don Jones. When Jones passed, Clinton said he “helped guide me on a spiritual and political journey of over 40 years.”

Clinton said the church she grew up in, “was very child-oriented, very supportive of kids in their early years as they tried to find their way through faith, not in a dogmatic way, but in a real open way in which anything could be discussed. No question was out of bounds. And I think that gave me a grounding in my faith that has sustained me.”

The church often worked with the black community and Mexican migrants. As a teenage volunteer, she was often involved in working with migrant families, watching their children. This may have helped shape her views on immigration. Clinton says her church was open to people of different races and cultures, which she believes was something of a revolution back then.

Clinton’s faith brought her into politics and is integral to decisions she makes and how she lives her life. Her faith has guided her to be sensitive to the world around her and to do something good in the world. For her, the spiritual aspect of her life is a very “important element,” in “defining who she is and what she cares about.”

Resources

Follow the Conversation on Twitter