PewRows

“The Pews of Safety Harbor Church” by Drew Coffman is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Research findings indicate that churchgoing may have an influence on the voting decisions made by Americans.
White American Protestants seem to be very happy with the way Donald Trump is handling the government as per a survey. It is common knowledge that white evangelicals were key in bringing Trump to power. Now, it has become obvious they are also happy with the way he has handled things after coming to power.

Pew shows 78 percent of white American evangelicals are satisfied with the Trump-led administration. He gets most of his support from evangelicals who are regular in their church attendance. Eight in ten white evangelicals approve of Trump and are found to attend church at least once a month.

White evangelicals are traditionally strong supporters of Republicans. What is surprising to most experts in American politics is, however, the fact that Trump could appeal so strongly to white evangelicals. Among all other Christians, the evangelical is more conservative and bible-centered, and so their support of Trump has come as a surprise. Trump is not exactly what most evangelicals would call as an exemplary Christian because of his lifestyle. In fact, Trump’s misogyny and lack of biblical knowledge had even led a few evangelical churches to oppose him vehemently. As such, experts opine that the majority of the evangelicals who support him are those that are new to the evangelicalism instead of being regular churchgoers.

However, surveys also show this number of evangelicals who are not regular church attendees form a very small number. At least 62 percent white Evangelicals are regular in their religious practices, and a larger attend church at least once a month.

Church attendance definitely has an influence on the opinions people have of Trump. Even among Catholics, for instance, there is greater support for Trump among Catholics who attend church regularly than among those who don't. The same is true for white mainline Protestants as well. Church attendance may have a significant role to play in making voting decisions, perhaps due to getting influenced by the opinions of others.

Resources

Follow the Conversation on Twitter