Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions addresses allegations at senate hearing.

Alabama Senator, Jeff Sessions, who has been elected as the future attorney general by President-Elect, Donald Trump, answered tough questions regarding his alleged racism and homophobia at the senate confirmation hearing.

Sessions was chosen to head the Department of Justice ever since he became the first senator to back Trump at the Republican Presidential Primary. However, his nomination has attracted plenty of negative feedback, with critics claiming Sessions had, in the past, indulged in racist behavior during his term as the Attorney General for Alabama.

When questioned about the allegations during the senate confirmation hearing, Sessions responded right away by saying the allegations were false and he was only looking to defend the integrity of the voting ballot. He implied that, in no way, did he intend to get in the way of African-American voting rights.

This response was in reference to an event in 1986 that saw Sessions being pulled into a scenario involving voter-fraud. Sessions has also been tagged as a KKK sympathizer, another allegation to which he responded by saying, "I abhor the Klan and its hateful ideology."

Sessions also recused himself from questions about Hillary Clinton, citing the controversial comments he made during a heated phase of the campaign. He also made it clear he would stand by the Supreme Court’s ruling on matters such as same-sex marriage and abortion.

When questioned by fellow Senator, Dianne Feinstein, about same-sex marriage, Sessions responded, "The Supreme Court has ruled on that, the dissents dissented vigorously, but it was 5-4 and … I will follow that decision."

In the past, Sessions made it very clear he opposed the legalization of gay marriage. In fact, he strongly criticized the Supreme Court’s ruling in 2015 supporting homosexual marriages. Sessions has even voted against covering sexual orientation under hate crime legislation.

On questions concerning Muslim immigrants, Sessions made it clear he would not prevent people from migrating to the U.S. because of their religious background and would not support such a law.

Sessions served as the Attorney General for Alabama from 1995 to 1997, after which, he made it to the United States Senate. As a senator, Sessions has spent his time drafting and implementing policies that were in line with his aim to limit governmental involvement, to maintain a strong military force, to provide tax reliefs to citizens in order to stimulate the economy, and to help Americans keep most of their earnings.

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