Faith groups provide aid to Louisiana flood victims.

Nobody can really tell why natural disasters take place. Science can tell us how, but for those who are devastated by such incidents the questions remain. Why? Why us? Why did we deserve this? Why our city? While various people describe these disasters as chance or divine will, the fact remains that it becomes a time of crisis for people who are spiritual as they start wondering why God would let that happen to them. The one good thing however that emerges during these times is the open display of human goodness. While humanity remains shrouded in work, business, politics and other mundane human activities in times of calm, natural disasters always see stories of great human outreach, love and altruism.

The recent floods in south central Louisiana left homes destroyed, hopes crushed and families devastated. But just when the material possessions of the people got washed away in the cruel rain, humanity seemed to have suddenly rediscovered itself when a number of Christian charities joined hands together to save the community however they could. Christian communities from Evangelical, LDS, Catholic, Baptist and even non-denominational groups joined hands together to provide relief for the victims. In the face of disaster each group seemed to have forgotten their personal differences and their one sole goal was nothing but to save the people -just as Christ would have intended.

Churches in Baton Rouge and Lafayette in Louisiana, the cities that are affected by the floods, have turned into relief centers. Medicine, food and other necessities are being made available in these centers. Church-owned boats are also acting as lifesaver boats which go around pulling people out of the water. The water in certain areas had risen up to five feet, sources say. As such, the task of rescuing people is a difficult one, but one that the rescuers are enthusiastically taking up.

Christian-run Samaritan's Purse is one of the most actively engaged rescue teams. The organization has chaplains to cater to the spiritual needs of the victims. The Samaritan Purse says that there are nearly 30,000 people who are to be saved. While the challenge looks very scary, they say they are undaunted and go on with their mission without fear.

Despite the losses, the faithful believe that not all has been lost. Though their possessions may have been destroyed, the sense of being a united family gives the victims courage and strength. 

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