Atheist and LGBT Collaborate on Book

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Queer Disbelief by Camille Beredjick and Hemant Mehta

People who follow LGBTQ rights news are usually familiar with the activist cum author Camille Beredjick. She is a prolific writer whose opinions on LGBTQ can be easily understood even by individuals who do not regularly follow such news. Her writings are critical of people who are against equal rights. They are always full of compassion and reason.

Camille Beredjick and Hemant Mehta, the noted atheist author and blogger started on a long-term project on LGBTQ and atheism, more specifically where the two communities overlap. They wanted to show where the line between LGBTQ rights and atheism became blurred and how religion even helped in the process. The book is one which atheists cannot ignore. The book is named Queer Disbelief. Beredjick has put in an untold amount of research into the book. She had written down the innumerable conversations where people bared their innermost thoughts and also shared their experiences. There was also a substantial number of autobiographical elements in those pages.

There are extremely good reasons why atheism and LGBTQ gel together. The atheism movement is parallel to the LGBTQ one. Both similarities and differences are there and the latter cannot be ignored. Queer Disbelief concerns how these two universes overlap more frequently than what was previously thought. It also explains how religious believers can be both the path forward or the obstacle towards true equality. The book also elaborates in detail why atheists should care about such issues. All these issues are examined in depth.

Queer Disbelief also shows how many non-believers who hold the belief that their support towards LGBTQ rights must not be assumed as atheism can be defined as in absolute terms like not believing in God’s existence. The book explains how atheists should be one of the most ardent supporters of all LGBTQ rights.

The LGBTQ individuals must not only enjoy equal rights; the atheists should advocate for them. Such action must not an extension of the atheistic beliefs, it should be the cause of atheists. For Camille, when she wrote for Hemant’s blog, she found out that there were fewer stories about atheists and LGBTQ working together. She found herself writing against homophobic religious groups. There was also the occasional story concerning an awesome LGBTQ accepting pastor or a church. Mehta believes that atheists should fight all three things: progressive faith groups, religious bigotry and collaboration opportunities.

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