The company has moved beyond cliché advertising

L’Oréal Paris broke new ground by casting Amena Khan, a British beauty blogger who also happens to wear a headscarf of pale pink color in a distinctive hair campaign. The ad in question had an eye-catching pink background. The advertisement proclaims to the reader that it is immaterial whether the reader's hair can be seen or not. Being visual does not affect how much it should be cared for.

Khan is not a newbie to the fashion industry. Other than blogging, she has also co-founded Ardere Cosmetics. In her own words, the L’Oréal advertisement is a “game-changing” one. She is fully aware that through this ad, she had made a mark in the fashion industry. Khan is the pioneer hijabi to be photographed and publicized in a mainstream hair advertisement.

According to Khan, her hair is the extension of her femininity. She loves to style her hair. She also applies numerous products on her tresses. It smells nice and these actions express who she as a person.

In an interview with Vogue magazine, she pointed out not many brands are doing what L’Oréal has done. The social media influencer said that unlike other hair modeling shoots where a mass of hair is seen, this advertisement features a woman whose hair is not seen. The reason, she contends, is that the company has valued the many voices that women have.

Khan continued in this vein in her media interview. She said that it is incorrect to presume that women covering their hair do not care for it. It means, the blogger pointed out, anyone who shows their hair takes care of it only to exhibit to others. This mindset, Khan said, strips the individual woman her autonomy and also the sense of independence. Hair, she added, is a vital component of self-care.

This advertisement trend makes clear that diversity has now become mainstream and coveted by multiple beauty and fashion brands. Adrien Koskas, the general manager of L’Oréal Paris UK, said in a statement that his company is all excited and proud to launch such a “unique and disruptive” campaign, especially for the haircare market. The category, which the company official diffidently pointed out, was previously known-and even now regarded- as the harbor of cliché advertising. He said that L’Oréal wants to “create campaigns that deeply connect with our consumers through spokespeople that inject sincerity, emotion and personality.”

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