The "In God We Trust" motto is not new to Florida state.

Florida school children returning back to their respective schools in August will see a new message in their educational institutions: “In God We Trust.” This happened due to the successful passing of a particular education bill signed by Republican Governor Rick Scott in March. The law includes a compulsion that all public schools should display these four words in every building utilized by the district school board. The four words must be displayed in a conspicuous place.

Representative Kimberly Daniels, a Democrat from Jacksonville, sponsored the measure. In her interview with the media, she claimed that such an excellent motto must be held aloft for all to read. When the Statute Title XLVII  Chapter 1003 came to the state house, she exhorted that this motto, which is inscribed on the great capitol walls and printed on the American dollar, must be exposed for all to see, and children must be educated on this matter. She went on further to say that the said motto is a component of American greatness. To prove her point, Daniels referred to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. She said that horrific events like the Parkland shooting will not be repeated if this religious text gets displayed in a prominent place. She described God as the "light" and said that schools need such lights.

The "In God We Trust" motto is not new to Florida state. It is a component of the state seal from 1868 and also on the state flag from 1990. The motto became an official part of the state only in 2006. This motto is a minor tweak on the first motto of the state, that read "In God is our Trust." Similar legislation was approved by other states' lawmakers as well. Schools in Alabama must compulsorily display an identical motto. There has been a fierce backlash against such legislation, with critics terming such legal recourses as a constant push towards theocracy. It is to be said that such legislation cannot be considered a mandate.

West Palm Beach WPTV has reported that some schools have already been provided signs to display.

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