Jewish Organizations and Synagogues receive flowers of solidarity from Muslims.

The one good thing about difficult times is that it brings people together. That is exactly what is happening in America today between Jews and Muslims. Both communities are facing hatred in the U.S., mainly because of their faiths. In these difficult moments, the two communities have discovered that only by supporting one another and standing for each other do they have a hope for survival.

After two Muslim social activists ran a fundraising campaign to restore a Jewish cemetery desecrated by vandals, The Muslim Student Associations of Florida State and Florida A&M universities delivered bouquets to Jewish organizations and synagogues. Although just a bunch of flowers, the humble bouquets are symbolic of a deep friendship, born out of difficulty and pain. The bouquets were sent to the Chabad and Hillel organizations in Florida State and Shomrei Torah and Temple Israel, both synagogues in Tallahassee.

The notes that accompanied the bouquets said that the Muslim community wants to extend a hand of friendship towards the Jewish community and it is important for both communities which are facing racial hatred in the U.S. to stand together and support one another. The senders expressed their hope the receivers would see the flowers as an expression of the solidarity between them.

The temples displayed their unexpected gifts for the Friday Shabbat services. Rabbi Jack Romberg of the Temple Israel said that the congregation was moved by the gesture, just as they were when they received the bouquets.

The Shomrei Torah temple received a hate-filled letter in December. In January, Jewish centers in 11 states received bomb threats from unknown people. Most recently, residents of St. Louis woke up to find the tombstones of the Jewish cemetery toppled.

The Jews too on their part have been doing what they can to support the Muslims. For example, the congregation members of the Temple Israel had decided if Trump’s suggested Muslim registry would ever become a reality, they too would sign up for it. Rabbi Romberg said it is not the time for the two communities to focus on their traditional differences and stand up for each other as both communities are equally facing hate crimes.

FSU Muslim Student Association President Moneba Anees said the bouquets were meant to be a sign of assurance that although they were unable to directly help the Jews when they faced hate crimes, they were constantly keeping note of whatever is happening and they offered them their prayers, love and support.

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