For some Christians celebrating Passover, it is a rediscovery of their faith

Although Christianity traces its origins in Judaism, the two faiths have traditionally been antagonistic to each other. Of late however, there is a growing reconciliation between people of both faiths. Christians, especially, are taking an interest in Judaism and Jewish traditions, perhaps because they believe they can understand their own faith better.

That is why when President Trump’s spiritual adviser, Paula White, gave a special message for Passover in March, instead for the Christian festival of Easter, her followers gladly accepted it. Christians, especially the Evangelicals are trying to imbibe a little bit of Jewish tradition in order to enhance their Christian faith.

Passover is a festival where the sins of the community are transferred to a lamb, which is killed. Evangelical Christians, who take the Bible in its literal sense, draw parallels between the killing of the lamb and the death of Jesus Christ. Based on his studies of the use of Passover by the evangelicals, John Dulin, an anthropologist at the Stanford University confirms this observation. He says for evangelicals, Passover is not just a festival where the salvation of the Jews was instituted, but a reenactment of the death of Christ, which brought salvation for all mankind.

Catholics too have begun to include the Passover meal as part of their liturgy. The Catholics have always been observing the Thursday before Good Friday as “Maundy Thursday,” in memory of Christ’s last Passover meal.

Christians in general are still divided on the matter of whether or not to celebrate Passover. The Christians who are opposed to it say that it undermines the importance and significance of Christ's sacrifice on the Cross. Those who are in favor of celebrating it, however, say that there is no harm in celebrating Passover because it is a way to connect with the roots of Christianity, which will help a Christian understand the circumstances of Jesus’ life and death better, thus enabling them to be better Christians.

The “Christian Seder”  also has the Jews concerned. While Passover is a meal that is partaken after eight days of preparation, the Christians simply focus on the Seder meal alone. Some Jews are not happy about the inclusion of Christ in the celebration.

Despite these differences, other Jews believe Passover can be a common ground for the two religions to come together.

Resources

Follow the Conversation on Twitter