By Zff2012 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

By Zff2012 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Weintraub began paying attention to what he called a higher power after his success as a concert promoter for Elvis, Frank Sinatra and others.

Long-time American music manager, concert promoter and film producer Jerry Weintraub suffered a cardiac arrest and passed away on Monday at the age of 77, the New York Times reports. Weintraub, whose television films won him three Emmys, didn’t consider himself religious, but he believed in “higher power.”

In an interview with the Desert Sun in 2010, Weintraub said that he began paying attention to what he called a higher power after his success as a concert promoter for Elvis, Frank Sinatra and others.

“I don’t know what that higher power is, but I believe in it,” he said. Weintraub preferred to call himself spiritual, not religious because of his inner turmoil about religion and because it seemed like every war was fought over it.

He also admitted having a series of mystical experiences throughout his life. One of these experiences led him to post a photo over his bed of a religious figure he was always conflicted about.

In the 1970s and 80’s, Weintraub became influential in the film industry after he produced movies like “Nashville,” Diner,” and “Oh, God!.” In 1984, he gained major success with “The Karate Kid,” which became a franchise of its own. In 1990, Weintraub went through a very public and humiliating bankruptcy. He bounced back in the 2000s with the “Ocean’s Eleven” trilogy, which made over $1 billion worldwide.

Weintraub was also known for his philantrophies as well as for his close ties with the Republican party. He is survived by his wife Jane Morgan Weintraub, his long-time girlfriend Susan Etkins, brother Melvyn, four children and five grandchildren.

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