Angelina Jolie responds to Trump’s ban on immigration from Muslim-majority countries.

Actress and humanitarian Angelina Jolie came down heavily against the refugee ban by U.S. President Donald Trump in an op-ed for the New York Times. Known for her humanitarian social services, it’s not surprising the 41-year old actress has come out in support of refugees who are trying to flee from violence and unrest.

In her article, Jolie strongly condemns the ban by saying that rather than preventing terrorists from entering the U.S., the ban has only succeeded in stopping the victims of terrorism from getting a life of peace and freedom. She notes that far from being terrorists themselves, the refugees are men and women who are themselves fleeing from terrorists. Preventing their entry into the U.S. is a cruel act, according to her.

The actress goes on to remind her readers about the sacrifices the ancestors of Americans have made in order to create a world of freedom and peace for people across limitations of geography, race, creed and other such factors. The ban on refugees from seven Muslim countries is a stark contrast to this tolerance and acceptance the founding fathers sought to base America on. She says the President’s decision is shocking for people all over the world for this very reason.

She says the need to secure the nation’s border is completely justifiable, especially in the wake of the terrorist attacks that have been increasing. However, she insists the U.S. government has a duty towards people from all over the world, even as it makes sure its citizens are safe.

Jolie says accepting refugees is an integral part of American society. She believes that rather than putting the country in danger, it upholds the country’s values of universal acceptance and compassion. She warns turning away these suffering refugees who seek asylum in the U.S., simply based on their faith, would only trigger hatred and backlash towards the U.S., for which the country will one day have to pay a heavy price.

She writes that such acts of alienation and intolerance has always made things worse for the countries. For example, the tortures meted out on Muslims post 9/11 spiked the number of terrorist attacks, which stemmed from feelings of resentment and anger. Jolie says the nation is once again doing the same mistake, and calls on Americans to avoid such acts of intolerance. She believes acting out of fear is not the real American way to deal with problems. Instead, she hopes the government will lead the Americans as one, across creed and race, and fight together against the common threat.

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