Teacher instructs seventh graders that God is a myth.

It’s generally accepted that everyone is entitled to his or her own beliefs. Even college mythology classes that breach the subject of a religion begin with caveats reassuring students that their beliefs are all perfectly viable and respected. However, this wasn’t the case for seventh-grader Jordan Wooley, who was uncompromisingly told by her teacher that God is a “myth” and saying he was “fact” or even “opinion” was categorically wrong.

The situation occurred on Monday, October 26, in Katy, Texas after Wooley’s teacher administered an exam on the existence of God. While recounting the incident to the Katy School Board, she said, “We were asked to take a poll to say whether God is fact, opinion or a myth, and she [the teacher] told anyone who said God was a fact or an opinion that they were wrong.”

According to Chantel Wooley, Jordan’s mother, the exam accounts for 40% of her daughter’s final grade. Any student who stuck to their beliefs would in turn receive a failing grade in the class. Despite the danger of failing, Jordan refused to renounce her beliefs.

Jordan went on to recount, “When kids would argue, she had told them that we would get in trouble.” When she attempted to argue, referencing the Bible when asked to “prove” her beliefs, the teacher said the book was just something people did “to get attention.”

Upon hearing the student’s testimony, Superintendent Alton Frailey said, “I’m truly sorry that you feel that your faith was questioned. What’s going on is that the principal was made aware of this today and will have a chance to work on that as per district policies and procedures. We will definitely be looking into that. Thank you very much. It was very brave of you.”

According to a report by Covering Katy, the teacher taught several classes the same lesson throughout the day. Students with other reading teachers said God wasn’t mentioned during their classes. The report states that the teacher in question appears to have veered heavily from the class curriculum.

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