Pat Robertson maintains that gay marriage is still illegal.

Popular televangelist Pat Robertson maintains that gay marriage is still illegal – and he may have a point.

Referring to the famous Obergefell vs. Hodges case in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that homosexuals had the Constitutional right to marry, Pat Robertson says that neither Congress nor some of the states have passed laws that legalize gay marriage, and in the absence of any laws to this effect, gay marriages continue to be illegal. The Supreme Court, being only a court of law where disputes are redressed according to the prevailing laws of the land, cannot enact any laws on its own as a part of the judiciary – that is the function of the executive.

Christian opposition to homosexuality is based on the Bible, which bans it as part of the Law of Moses (this is found in Chapter 18, Verse 22 of the Book of Leviticus, while Chapter 20, Verse 13 of the same Book says the punishment for such an act is death), and in the new Testament, St. Paul affirms this in his first letter to the Corinthians, when he states in Chapter 6, Verse 9 that homosexuals would not inherit the Kingdom of Heaven.

However, some say that the passage found in the St. Paul's letter to the Romans, specifically Chapter 13, Verses 1-4, which asks Christians to bow to authorities is Biblical support for gay marriage when the 'authorities' have 'legalized' them. Pat Robertson, formerly a Southern Baptist minister who hosts The 700 Club show on ABC Family Channel, warns against misinterpreting the Bible as there is no federal law that makes gay marriage legal, neither are there state laws to this effect in certain parts of the country. Several Republican-ruled states have refrained from implementing the Supreme Court's ruling in light of the upcoming U.S. Presidential Elections in 2016, fearing it could alienate the Republican Party from their voters.

Robertson is a Republican himself and Mike Huckabee, a former Governor of Arkansas who is in the running for the Republican nomination to the U.S. Presidential elections, echoes his views, quoting St. Augustine that an unjust law is no law at all. The Roman Catholic Church, which is opposed to homosexuality, asks its members to let their conscience guide them as to whether to follow the law of the land.

Resources

Follow the Conversation on Twitter