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Freedom from Religion Foundation launches assault protesting Pope Francis’ visit with National Ads.

A lot of Americans and the media may be very excited about the Pope’s visit, but that’s clearly not the case with the FFRF (Freedom from Religion Foundation). The organization is focused on reminding everyone that a religious leader has no role to play in advising Congress. They have went on to state that the government shouldn’t be encouraging the Pope’s religious views on the common people, despite his position as a Head of State.

The organization has published full page ads criticizing the Pope’s visit. These ads have been displayed across major publications including the Philadelphia Enquirer, the Washington Post, USA Today, and the New York Times. One of the ads, published in the New York Times, showcases some of the controversial policies adopted and promoted by the Pope and the Catholic Church. The ad uses a Ten Commandments tablet illustration to get the message across.

In another ad, published in the Washington Post, FFRF reminds Americans about how government and religion do not go hand in hand. The ad features words stressing on the need to separate church and state from the speech given by John F. Kennedy at the Greater Houston Ministerial Association on September 12, 1960.

The FFRF also had a 30-second television spot employing the same theme as the one used in the Washington Post. The 30-second PSA (Public Service Announcement) of sorts aired across metropolitan locations during CBS’s Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Wednesday. The airing locations included Los Angeles, Baltimore, Seattle, Phoenix, Austin, Salt Lake City, Madison, New York City, Pittsburgh, Denver, Miami, Boston, Minneapolis, Detroit, San Francisco, Dallas, Philadelphia, and Chicago. CBS did not give reasons for refusing to air the ad nationally.

They’ve also published a “Pope Polka Song” on YouTube.

The JFK themed TV ad will also air tonight on ABC Nightly News during the coverage of the Pope’s address to the Congress joint session.

Apart from the ads, FFRF has also implemented formal protests as part of its campaign. The organization has written to John Boehner requesting him to invite celebrated biologist and radical atheist, Richard Dawkins to address the joint session of Congress and to provide a balanced perspective. FFRF has also criticized and protested against several other campaigns and programs promoting the Pope’s visit including the White House’s promotion of the Pope’s devotional events on its website.

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