Justin Welby Immigration

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, showed disapproval of the anti-immigration sentiment in British politics noting that all humans are equals.

The head of the Anglican Church, the Archbishop of Canterbury, recently made statements regarding the immigration policies in England. The issue is highly relevant among citizens with a national election just months away. Candidates have been tightening their positions on the matter extensively in an effort to garner support. However, Justin Welby voiced great concern with the hints of intolerance found within these stricter policies and statements released by high profile government leaders.

Tolerance For Immigrants

Welby stated that the language used by politicians recently ignores the individual through grouping every immigrant under a negative, harmful connotation. He elaborated by recognizing the advantages that diversification brings into the country and the great role it has played throughout history. The leader of the Church of England even labeled recent comments as “minor-racist, anti-foreigner, anti-Semitic, anti-Islamic.” He clearly outlines that immigrants are not going to overwhelm England, considering the vast amounts that have flocked to the country over centuries, and they are much more valuable to society than discussed by politicians.

Concern Over Immigration Policies

He goes on further to point out that the most optimal immigration policy would cater to the citizens of England, particularly low income, and also welcome individuals from across the world. These people can bring many favorable attributes to the communities by offering diverse perspectives and lifestyles, according to Welby. His opinion is widely regarded, considering he leads the Anglican Church, which encompasses over eighty million followers. Therefore, the candidates for upcoming elections and current politicians should carefully examine any statements released to ensure the utmost care and consideration is awarded to this highly debated issue.

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