The Halloween holiday is rooted in Christian traditions.

Jimmy Kimmel has admitted he does not prefer Halloween. His non-preference, however, pales in significance when compared to Pat Robertson, the persistent televangelist. The staff of Kimmel's popular show did what only they can: stitched together a compilation of the camera loving preacher denouncing Halloween .

The right-wing preacher has spoken forcefully and repeatedly against Halloween, equating it with devil worship. Robertson describes performers as demons and tells his audience not to touch the drinks, which he claims compels the drinker to turn towards Satanism. The televangelist has also described techno music as another demonic element which pushes the unwary into the hands of Beelzebub and its unholy cohorts. Not surprisingly, the 86-year-old describes music DJs as demons.

In his message to conservative parents who unfortunately hold the same view as him, Robertson told them to tell their children the truth. The children should be taught the devil wants them and it wants to destroy them. To do this, Satan will put everything nice in their path so that doing bad things will seem like a fun thing to do. He described Halloween as a time when the devil rejoices.

For the common people, Robertson's rants against this October 31 event is nothing new. The preacher hates Halloween so much that he blamed the event for the devastating earthquake which destroyed Haiti in 2010. He said that children unwittingly dress as “devils, witches and goblins.” For anxious parents, he also has a viable solution.

Robertson preached to concerned conservative parents that churches should celebrate alternative kinds of Halloween celebrations. These festivals should have all the elements which young people crave- pretty girls and handsome boys. Robertson is not alone in his fanaticism. A survey by LifeWay Research has confirmed that about 1,000 Protestant pastors hold identical views. They also urge their flock to attend church events during Halloween or any other fall festivals or judgment house.

The irony is that Halloween has its roots in Christian traditions. The event can be likened with Feast of All Souls and Feast of All Saints. Scott Bruce, a professor of history at Colorado University, said the festival has its origins when poor people during times of All Souls and All Saints will knock from one residence to another, expecting a morsel of food. This is termed as “souling.” Most households gave a sweet shaped like a wafer. Those who gave the soul food, in turn, expected good things for the soul.

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