Jerry Falwell Jr. will lead Trump’s higher education task force.

One of the most well-known evangelical supporters of Donald Trump, Jerry Falwell Jr., has been appointed to lead the higher education task force for the United States. As President of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, and a member of one of America’s most powerful evangelical families, Falwell’s responsibility will be to reform and revise the education system in America.

The task force Falwell will be heading will advise the Department of Education on matters related to changes at the federal agencies to policies and procedures. According to the University’s spokesperson, Len Stevens, Falwell will focus on bringing “overregulation and micromanagement of higher education” to the task force. This is the second time the evangelical leader has been asked to take up a position overseeing education. He earlier declined an offer by Trump’s party to become the education secretary as he wanted to live with his family in Lynchburg.

Falwell revealed that his plans in heading the task force include reducing what he calls as “intrusion” by the Department of Education into the affairs of the institutions. He wants to give colleges and their accrediting agencies more freedom to govern their affairs more freely. For now, he feels that the Department involves too much and hampers the smooth functioning of the educational institutions.

Both Falwell and Trump have similar opinions about how the Department of Education functions. For one, Trump said it’s way too “massive and can be largely eliminated,” in an interview with Fox News. Falwell, however, is not of the opinion the Department should be eliminated. All he wants is that the regulations should be scaled back and that grants should be given more freely to colleges.

This is not the first time a politician has called the regulations as massive. Openly liberal Vanderbilt University Chancellor Nicholas Zeppos, who was appointed by Barack Obama to head a similar task force as this time, said the regulations were “unnecessarily voluminous” and it was “inordinately costly” for institutions to meet all the regulations to have access to the grants.

Now, Falwell also talks about the regulations as being too many in number, and that’s definitely going to be of first priority in his agenda. That’s not all, however. Falwell says he has a whole notebook full of issues in the Department that he wants to fix, although he hasn’t mentioned anything specifically.

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