Christian Singer Facing Leftist Author in Costa Rican Presidential Race

By Presidencia de la Repùblica de Costa Rica [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Costa Rica can fall prey to conservative forces

Fiction writer and former prog-rock vocalist, Carlos Alvarado Quesada, will compete with Christian singer Fabricio Alvarado Munoz for the post of President of Costa Rica . Quesada once held the Labor Minister post. The April 1 elections hold multiple implications for the country as a Munoz victory will provide fuel to conservative forces in the Latin American nation. There could be a regression of gay rights in this Central American nation. The seeds of success were sown by the proliferation of evangelical churches that are now found all over the country. These churches are coordinating backlashes against any expansion of LGBT rights.

Munoz has the upper edge just now. His first-round win was not an overwhelming mandate as it received much fewer than the 40 percent of total votes required to bypass the second round. The conservative candidate has garnered votes on several issues, including the fierce opposition towards gay marriage. The rise of conservatives was helped by the decline of the centrist two party system which made the country much more stable when contrasted with other countries in the region.

Munoz won 24.9 percent of the February 4 vote. His political experience consists of being elected in 2014 to the national assembly. The telegenic singer was the sole federal deputy representing National Restoration Party or PRN. The PRN has the support of evangelical Christians. The party has increased its political presence in the national assembly and now has 14 seats. This conservative party has opposed the modern and progressive steps taken by Luis Guillermo Solis, the outgoing Costa Rican President. The present government has taken bold steps like the legalization of same-sex marriage, sex education in the school curriculum, and in-vitro fertilization.

Alvarado Quesada, the political rival of Munoz, is of a liberal bent. He backs the court decision taken on same-sex couples. He has a winning chance even though most Costa Rican voters describe themselves as conservatives. Many of them are worried by the strident tone taken as part of the campaign. He tried to connect with the country's young voters telling them that he used to sing in a rock band called Dramatika. The former minister studied at the University of Sussex, UK. The last book he wrote bore the title Brighton Season.

Resources

Follow the Conversation on Twitter