BYU caffeine

Students are excited for the change on campus.

Brigham Young University, a well-known Mormon institution has lifted the ban on the sale of caffeinated beverages within the campus. This prohibition, instituted in 1950's has been in existence for nearly six decades. The university shocked its students after posting a picture of a Coca-Cola can with the words 'It’s Happening.'

This decision has been met with a lot of excitement from the students and alumni of the school. Christopher Jones, a 34-year-old visiting professor, was among the first to purchase a Coke from the vending machines. He posted on Twitter with excitement saying “Did I just buy the first ever caffeinated Coke Zero Sugar sold in #BYU's Wilkinson Student Center? Yes, yes I did."

The decision to ban caffeinated drinks originated from Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism. In 1833, Joseph had the revelation that his 16 million followers worldwide should refrain from taking alcohol, coffee, and tea. This, later on, evolved into an abstinence from all caffeinated drinks. The decision was later revised by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints issuing a new list of drinks Mormon members should refrain from consuming.

The University, however, did not abide by the revised laws. Despite allowing students to have caffeinated drinks on campus, the university did not permit the sale of any caffeinated drinks citing the lack of demand. This has been noted to change by Brigham Young University spokeswoman Carri Jenkins saying, “I have been told that students are lining up.” The increased demand for caffeinated drinks has allegedly made the school allow for their sale. The drinks will be available in cafeterias and at sports events.

Alumni of the school have received this news with joy, noting that this decision might even change the perspective of Mormons on caffeine. As to whether that is true, only time will tell.

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