Photo: Kirsty Wigglesworth

Photo: Kirsty Wigglesworth

Ukip hopeful wants to ban Muslim veil, close faith schools and ban Sharia courts.

A candidate running for office wishes to ban Muslim women from wearing a veil in public buildings, shopping malls and stores, and on buses and trains.

No, this is not in the United States, and it is not Donald Trump.

It’s Lisa Duffy, a United Kingdom Independence Party (Ukip) leadership candidate, and her plans don’t end with the bans on veils. She also wants to close Islamic faith schools and institute a “complete and comprehensive ban” on Sharia courts in the UK until the problem of Islamic terrorism is wiped out, reports The Guardian.

Speaking in London, Duffy said her proposals are designed to help integrate Muslims into the ways of the British. “Muslims who were born in this country…are as British as I am and I simply want them to feel as British as I do.”

Ukip MEP Bill Etheridge, also vying to succeed Nigel Farage as the party’s head, does not want to focus on issues such as Islam, warning that it would make them look “small-minded.” Further, he does not want to chase the “bigot vote,” but instead “focus on our policies, cementing libertarianism into our DNA.”

Duffy said she wants to create a “path of opportunity” for young Muslim women, noting that the veil is “a symbol of aggressive separatism” and is “forced on women by men who view them as their property.”

She continued: “Why should I, as a white, Christian woman, effectively enjoy greater civil and human rights and freedoms than others?”

The race between Duffy and Farage is interesting to say the least, as both think they are representing the best interests of Muslims with their platforms.

And while the knee-jerk comparison for Duffy is Trump, she states that she “is very different [than] him.”

Duffy and Etheridge are two of six candidates for the post of Ukip leader, joining Diane James, Elizabeth Jones, Jonathan Arnott, and Phillip Broughton. The winner will be announced on September 15 in Bournemouth.

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