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Pope Francis sent $100,000 in hurricane relief funds to Haiti.

An amount of $100,000 is being sent to Haiti by Pope Francis as emergency funding for the country ravaged by Hurricane Matthew. It is an initial contribution from the Vatican, donated through the Pontifical Council Cor Unum. The objective of the money is to support people affected by floods and “is intended as a first and immediate concrete expression of the feelings of paternal spiritual closeness and encouragement of the Holy Father toward the people and territories affected,” an October 14, Vatican communique read.

In the Pope’s October 7 telegram, he entrusted Haitian citizens to “maternal protection” of the Our Lady of Perpetual Help.

The catastrophic hurricane barreled into Haiti on October 4. Over 1,000 deaths have been reported and thousands displaced. Hurricane Mathew, a category four storm, hit Haiti in the morning at 145 miles per hour. It is regarded as the most powerful storm in the Caribbean region in a decade. The country is still recovering from the 2010 tumultuous earthquake.

The BBC reported 1,000 people have died and thousands have lost everything to nature. Many Haitians living in fishing villages and towns died due to debris, swollen rivers and fallen trees. Many charitable organizations have provided help to Haiti. Assistance is provided with the help of Caritas Haiti and Caritas Internationalis. The latter has launched an appeal for aid to fund the purchase of hygiene and food kits.

The BBC has reported about 1.4 million individuals are in urgent need of assistance. About $120 million has been pledged by the United Nations for medical help, water, sanitation, and shelter. There is also fear of another cholera outbreak like the one that happened following the 2010 earthquake causing 10,000 deaths. 200 cholera cases have been reported and vaccines have been dispatched by World Health Organization.

Pope Francis has entrusted the departed to God's mercy asking the lord to “welcome them into his light.” 

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